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Rock It! David Bielander Wellpappe Series Bracelets

Thursday, 29 October 2015

“I aim to walk that fine line between making something simple enough that one unavoidably recognizes, that simultaneously requires a fair conscious effort to get beyond the obvious, and at the same time to be abstract enough that it allows a shift to happen, that the piece becomes something altogether new when it unpredictably connects with you.”

- David Bielander


Award-winning jewellery artist David Bielander takes the familiarity of everyday mundane items into wearable pieces of art that are decidedly deceptive yet witty at the same time. Bielander Wellpappe series of collection explores the concept of false identity - these hastily put-together cardboard bracelets are actually made of silver and white gold, even down to the finest details such as staples to fasten, patinated surface and corrugated edges. This awe-inspiring collection is to be seen to believe, how something so simple, so childhood evoking, becomes a piece of art that will remain in jewellery enthusiasts consciousness for a while to come. 

galleryfunaki.com.au 


David Bielander's creations are inspired by the everyday world, by things that have stayed with him or that come from the collective consciousness of our society. Once the object is placed on a person, it reveals its potential as a personal jewellery item.
This kind of ambiguity is an integral part of all his designs. In 2002, after training as a goldsmith in Basel, he completed his master's degree at the Akademie der Bildenden Künste in Munich under Otto Künzli. The influence of his teacher can readily be recognised - a rounded, many-faceted education expressed in a sure knowledge of materials and in skilled craftsmanship. His creations are distinct, to a certain degree, from traditional decorative art. They retain their function as ornaments, but the downright banal character of these everyday shapes is startling. A silver slug to be worn as a brooch? A bracelet shaped like a tyre? A necklace of wooden weisswurst?
The last of these objects is a good example of the way David Bielander works. The sausage elements are based on the armrests of Thonet's No. 14 Chair - not because the artist's intention is to create an homage to a classic design or because he happens to like the chair, but because the armrests possess precisely the correct shape and curvature. Bielander adds that the sausages were in fact always present in the chair, and that what he has done is to ‘liberate' them!
For the ‘Mistkäfer' (dung beetle) he again makes use of an existing shape: a steel teaspoon. In this case, nothing was cut away; instead, the whole spoon was transformed into a perfect dung beetle, complete with legs, wings and a proboscis, by cutting into and bending its metal. This is a process that we associate with magic tricks - but David Bielander performs it to perfection.
Where David Bielander is involved, nothing is as it seems. The artist free-associates objects, forms, colours and everyday scenes. He simultaneously maintains abstraction and sufficient simplicity, leaving us free to make our own interpretation. His decorative items, however, are always made to be worn, and to be becoming to the wearerDavid Bielander worked as an apprentice goldsmith in Basel and worked for the industrial designer and jewellery maker Georg Spreng before studying under professor Otto Künzli at the Academy of Fine Arts, Munich. In 2006 he became the Artistic Assistant to Professor Daniel Kruger at the Academy of Fine Arts Burg Giebichenstein, Halle, Germany and in 2011, an external consultant to the jewellery department at Gerrit Rietveld Academie in Amsterdam. Bielander takes the familiarity of everyday objects and combines them with a witty abstraction to create truly uncanny pieces of wearable art. His work has seen him win numerous awards including the Herbert Hoffmann Prize in 2010 and the Francoise van den Bosch Award in 2012. His work is held in many public collections including the Fond National des Arts Contemporain, France, the CODA Museum, Apeldoorn, the Neue Sammlung, Munich and the National Gallery of Victoria. Bielander lives and works in Munich where he currently shares a studio with fellow represented artists Yutaka Minegishi and Helen Britton.

David Bielander's creations are inspired by the everyday world, by things that have stayed with him or that come from the collective consciousness of our society. Once the object is placed on a person, it reveals its potential as a personal jewellery item.
This kind of ambiguity is an integral part of all his designs. In 2002, after training as a goldsmith in Basel, he completed his master's degree at the Akademie der Bildenden Künste in Munich under Otto Künzli. The influence of his teacher can readily be recognised - a rounded, many-faceted education expressed in a sure knowledge of materials and in skilled craftsmanship. His creations are distinct, to a certain degree, from traditional decorative art. They retain their function as ornaments, but the downright banal character of these everyday shapes is startling. A silver slug to be worn as a brooch? A bracelet shaped like a tyre? A necklace of wooden weisswurst?
The last of these objects is a good example of the way David Bielander works. The sausage elements are based on the armrests of Thonet's No. 14 Chair - not because the artist's intention is to create an homage to a classic design or because he happens to like the chair, but because the armrests possess precisely the correct shape and curvature. Bielander adds that the sausages were in fact always present in the chair, and that what he has done is to ‘liberate' them!
For the ‘Mistkäfer' (dung beetle) he again makes use of an existing shape: a steel teaspoon. In this case, nothing was cut away; instead, the whole spoon was transformed into a perfect dung beetle, complete with legs, wings and a proboscis, by cutting into and bending its metal. This is a process that we associate with magic tricks - but David Bielander performs it to perfection.
Where David Bielander is involved, nothing is as it seems. The artist free-associates objects, forms, colours and everyday scenes. He simultaneously maintains abstraction and sufficient simplicity, leaving us free to make our own interpretation. His decorative items, however, are always made to be worn, and to be becoming to the wearer.

David Bielander's creations are inspired by the everyday world, by things that have stayed with him or that come from the collective consciousness of our society. Once the object is placed on a person, it reveals its potential as a personal jewellery item.
This kind of ambiguity is an integral part of all his designs. In 2002, after training as a goldsmith in Basel, he completed his master's degree at the Akademie der Bildenden Künste in Munich under Otto Künzli. The influence of his teacher can readily be recognised - a rounded, many-faceted education expressed in a sure knowledge of materials and in skilled craftsmanship. His creations are distinct, to a certain degree, from traditional decorative art. They retain their function as ornaments, but the downright banal character of these everyday shapes is startling. A silver slug to be worn as a brooch? A bracelet shaped like a tyre? A necklace of wooden weisswurst?
The last of these objects is a good example of the way David Bielander works. The sausage elements are based on the armrests of Thonet's No. 14 Chair - not because the artist's intention is to create an homage to a classic design or because he happens to like the chair, but because the armrests possess precisely the correct shape and curvature. Bielander adds that the sausages were in fact always present in the chair, and that what he has done is to ‘liberate' them!
For the ‘Mistkäfer' (dung beetle) he again makes use of an existing shape: a steel teaspoon. In this case, nothing was cut away; instead, the whole spoon was transformed into a perfect dung beetle, complete with legs, wings and a proboscis, by cutting into and bending its metal. This is a process that we associate with magic tricks - but David Bielander performs it to perfection.
Where David Bielander is involved, nothing is as it seems. The artist free-associates objects, forms, colours and everyday scenes. He simultaneously maintains abstraction and sufficient simplicity, leaving us free to make our own interpretation. His decorative items, however, are always made to be worn, and to be becoming to the wearer
David Bielander's creations are inspired by the everyday world, by things that have stayed with him or that come from the collective consciousness of our society. Once the object is placed on a person, it reveals its potential as a personal jewellery item.
This kind of ambiguity is an integral part of all his designs. In 2002, after training as a goldsmith in Basel, he completed his master's degree at the Akademie der Bildenden Künste in Munich under Otto Künzli. The influence of his teacher can readily be recognised - a rounded, many-faceted education expressed in a sure knowledge of materials and in skilled craftsmanship. His creations are distinct, to a certain degree, from traditional decorative art. They retain their function as ornaments, but the downright banal character of these everyday shapes is startling. A silver slug to be worn as a brooch? A bracelet shaped like a tyre? A necklace of wooden weisswurst?
The last of these objects is a good example of the way David Bielander works. The sausage elements are based on the armrests of Thonet's No. 14 Chair - not because the artist's intention is to create an homage to a classic design or because he happens to like the chair, but because the armrests possess precisely the correct shape and curvature. Bielander adds that the sausages were in fact always present in the chair, and that what he has done is to ‘liberate' them!
For the ‘Mistkäfer' (dung beetle) he again makes use of an existing shape: a steel teaspoon. In this case, nothing was cut away; instead, the whole spoon was transformed into a perfect dung beetle, complete with legs, wings and a proboscis, by cutting into and bending its metal. This is a process that we associate with magic tricks - but David Bielander performs it to perfection.
Where David Bielander is involved, nothing is as it seems. The artist free-associates objects, forms, colours and everyday scenes. He simultaneously maintains abstraction and sufficient simplicity, leaving us free to make our own interpretation. His decorative items, however, are always made to be worn, and to be becoming to the wearer

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